The Thankless Work of the WHO

Despite having one-fourth the budget of the American CDC—and a host of structural problems owed to being governed by nearly 200 countries—the WHO does quite a lot of good work, most of it behind the scenes and thus unappreciated—hence most Americans being indifferent, if not supportive, of our recent withdrawal.

➡️ It helped eradicate smallpox, a scourge of humanity throughout history that used to kill millions annually, even into the mid 20th century. This was accomplished partly by getting Cold War rivals the U.S. and Russia to consolidate their scientific and technological resources. In 1975, less than a decade after launching this effort, smallpox was vanquished.

➡️ It is close to eradicating polio, another horrific infectious disease that was once widespread, but now lingers in only two or three countries. Rates of polio infection dropped 99% since the global campaign was launched in 1988.

➡️ HIV/AIDS is no longer the death sentence it used to be, thanks in large part to the WHO, which reduced the cost of HIV medication by literally 95.5%. Over 80% of people with HIV/AIDS use drugs backed by the WHO; consequently, AIDS-related deaths have declined by over half since their peak in 2004.

➡️ The WHO is currently working on reducing the cost of insulin as well, as nearly half the world’s 80 million diabetics cannot afford it (including in the U.S.). It hopes to achieve the same results as with HIV/AIDS, through the same process known as “prequalification” (in which cheaper drugs, mostly from developing countries, are approved for safety and efficacy, allowing them to enter the global market).

➡️ In 2017 alone, it helped stem a yellow fever outbreak in Brazil (by providing 3.5 million vaccine doses), provided vaccines to nearly five million children in Yemen in the midst of its civil war; expanded mental health support to Syrians affected by their civil war; and provided new healthcare support (such as ambulances) in places like Iraq and South Sudan).

➡️ With respect to COVID-19, the WHO has shipped literally millions of items of personal protective equipment to 133 countries. It has launched a global trial involving the world’s top medical experts to find the most promising treatments and vaccine. As of now, 5,500 patients have been recruited in 21 countries, with over 100 countries joining or expressing interest in joining the trial.

➡️ Early on, the U.S. received vital early epidemiological data from China only because the WHO used its good relations to broker access. That’s the same reason the otherwise secretive Chinese eventually published the first genetic profile of the virus for the world to use. Against initial resistance, the WHO succeeded in making China allow observers into the country; in early February, an international team led by the agency visited Wuhan, including those from the CDC and NIH.

➡️In 2018, the WHO warned the world that it was not ready for a pandemic and needed to do more. It declared COVID-19 an emergency on January 30, when there were still relatively few reported cases outside China. World leaders still had the info and time to act, and some countries responded immediately; South Korea, New Zealand, and others implemented an effective blend of policies that made them one of the top success stories. The WHO cannot be blamed for our slow response.

➡️ Even Trump himself seemed to acknowledge the WHO’s work with gratitude. In late February, he tweeted “Coronavirus is very much under control in the USA. We are in contact with everyone and all relevant countries. CDC & World Health have been working hard and very smart…” In the weeks leading up to its withdrawal, the U.S. was still leaning on WHO experts for assistance, with even Secretary of State Pompeo trying to get the administration to soften its break up with the organization.

As always, I welcome any fact checking on these claims.

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