The Benefits of Indoor Plants

Though I cannot confirm the efficacy of the many studies cited in the following
Vice article, I can speak from experience that gardening and caring for indoor plants has always been therapeutic for me; in fact, I attribute it to helping me cope with many a stressful or melancholic episode.

What’s good for the body is good for the brain, and the toxin-absorbing, air-purifying abilities of plants like pothos, aloe vera, and ivy are worth considering on your next trip to the nursery. Scented plants have health benefits, too: the smell of flowers like jasmine and lavender have been shown to lower anxiety and stress, and promote a good night’s sleep.

Researchers have been promoting the mental health benefits of horticulture for decades, and for good reason. Studies have repeatedly shown that the act of tending to plants can take our minds off the bad stuff, relieve stress, and have an overall calming effect. Gardening is so good for your brain that it’s even thought to lower the risk of dementia.

[…]

One recent study was able to demonstrate that a group of people in their early twenties experienced a massive decrease in blood pressure and other physical stress symptoms when they followed a computer-related task with an indoor gardening session; the results suggested that tending to indoor plants “reduced physiological and psychological stress, especially in comparison to mental tasks performed using technology.

[…]

The science is pretty clear on all this: humans are happier when they’re close to aesthetically-pleasing living things. Office workers have been found to be more productive and happy when surrounded by indoor plants, and having plants in hospital rooms helps surgical patients recover faster by lowering blood pressure, pain, and fatigue levels. Studies have found that even the literal act of looking out the window at a tiny strip of sad urban park can have restorative mental health properties—which means by investing in a couple of hanging baskets, you’ll actually be ahead of the game. Eyeballing the colour green has been found to promote emotional stability, whereas the presence of bright-coloured flowers can provide an instant mood booster.

Perhaps this isn’t too surprising, given that we did evolve and live in nature across millennia, after all.

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