Lessons From Charlotte and Salt Lake City On Ending Homelessness

Hundreds of thousands of Americans are homeless across the country, and it seems no city, big and small, is without a sizeable number residents deprived of permanent shelter.

Though Charlotte, North Carolina may be an exception.

According to a recent article in HuffPo, the city of over 775,200 has made groundbreaking strides in addressing chronic homelessness — and it has done so in the simplest way possible.

Moore Place, a nonprofit that provides permanent housing and other services to homeless people, has saved Charlotte $2.4 million in medical costs alone since 2012, according to a new report from UNC Charlotte. The study also found that the program’s clients are more likely to take advantage of preventative health care services, and get off the streets for good, than people who aren’t offered stable housing.

After two years of partaking in the program, 81 percent of clients remained in permanent housing.

“Stable housing provides a foundation for recovery and well-being,” Lori Thomas, a UNC professor of social work who led the study, said in a statement.

The 85-unit apartment complex follows the “housing first” model, an approach that once raised eyebrows, but has repeatedly proven to be cost-effective and efficient.

The concept promotes giving homeless people housing, and then addressing their mental health, unemployment or addiction issues after they’re settled.

Run by Urban Ministry Center, Moore Place opened in 2012 and gives clients access to a team of social workers, therapists, a nurse and psychologist, in addition to a place to call “home.” It costs about $14,000 to house an individual and residents contribute 30 percent of their incomes to rent. The rest is subsidized by private donations and public funding.

The program gives participating clients a fresh start and has led to major savings in the city’s medical system.

Tenants visited emergency rooms 648 fewer times and were in the hospital 292 fewer days after two years in the program.

Moore Place, a nonprofit that provides permanent housing and other services to homeless people, has saved Charlotte $2.4 million in medical costs alone since 2012, according to a new report from UNC Charlotte. The study also found that the program’s clients are more likely to take advantage of preventative health care services, and get off the streets for good, than people who aren’t offered stable housing.

After two years of partaking in the program, 81 percent of clients remained in permanent housing.

“Stable housing provides a foundation for recovery and well-being”, Lori Thomas, a UNC professor of social work who led the study, said in a statement.

The 85-unit apartment complex follows the “housing first” model, an approach that once raised eyebrows, but has repeatedly proven to be cost-effective and efficient.

The concept promotes giving homeless people housing, and then addressing their mental health, unemployment or addiction issues after they’re settled.

Run by Urban Ministry Center, Moore Place opened in 2012 and gives clients access to a team of social workers, therapists, a nurse and psychologist, in addition to a place to call “home”. It costs about $14,000 to house an individual and residents contribute 30 percent of their incomes to rent. The rest is subsidized by private donations and public funding.

The program gives participating clients a fresh start and has led to major savings in the city’s medical system.

Tenants visited emergency rooms 648 fewer times and were in the hospital 292 fewer days after two years in the program.

It seems like common sense: solve homelessness by giving the homeless homes. In some cases, it may not even be necessary to build any new stock, since most cities have ample vacant developments (especially following the burst of the real estate bubble). Providing permanent shelter helps line everything else into place, from finding steady employment (for which a permanent address is contingent) to, as Charlotte found, getting adequate healthcare.

Salt Lake City, Utah has seen similar resounding success with its decade-long “Housing First” initiative, which has lead to an incredible 91 percent reduction in chronic homelessness (defined as those who are homelessness longer than one year or who endure four episodes of homelessness in three years, and they have a disabling condition).

More from Deseret News:

Utah’s program places chronically homeless people in housing and supports them with services that help address the root causes of their homelessness such as physical and mental illness, substance abuse and addiction, low educational attainment, criminal records, or poor work histories.

Before “Housing First” started in 2005, about 14 percent of Utah’s homeless population met the definition of chronic homelessness and consumed about 58 percent of resources.

“Before the ‘Housing First’ model, people had to change their lives, and then we would offer them housing. Now what we do is we offer them housing and allow them to change their lives if they choose to do so,” Walker said.

Utah is the only state that has achieved such a sharp reduction in chronic homelessness on a statewide basis, he said.

“No other state is even close. We’ve had no additional resources than anyone else has had to do this, but by focusing, having a plan and having great collaboration with our partners, we’ve been able to see successes,” Walker said.

Around 10 percent of the nation’s homeless population is chronically homeless, and they account for more than 50 percent of available resources going to Americans experiencing homelessness. Housing these individuals in particular would not only improve their lives substantially, but will free up a considerable amount of capital and resources to other efforts (such as medical care, job training, and the like).

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